ISNTD FESTIVAL

2019

WORKSHOP D: VIDEO, A NEW (OLD) TOOL TO PRESENT RESEARCH EVIDENCE TO POLICY-MAKERS

The value of video from the field to motivate policy-makers to make evidence-based healthcare policy changes

This workshop presents lessons learnt on how and when to use a video of research subjects as a research dissemination tool with policy-makers. It is based on qualitative research that examined the perceptions of policy-makers on the acceptability of using narrative approaches so that research participants could explain their impressions of the study and how it affected them.

 

This workshop presents lessons learnt on how and when to use a video of research subjects and stakeholders as a research dissemination tool with policy-makers. It is based on qualitative research that examined the perceptions of policy-makers on the acceptability of showing video interviews and scenes among research participants and stakeholders about their impressions of the study and how it affected them. Narrative approaches allowed people to tell their own story, providing for more nuanced interpretations as well as specific examples of how the intervention studied was valued or utilized, and barriers that needed to be addressed. These stories were used to reinforce qualitative social research on the intervention studied, and shown at a meeting to review the research findings among policy-makers, practitioners and key

stakeholders.

 

This study provided several unique aspects: 1) It brought to the policy panel the perceptions of those who would not have otherwise been included in the review of evidence; 2) It built upon earlier evidence of video effectiveness to provide information that incorporates emotion and storytelling, which is different from traditional evidence dissemination formats like policy briefs; and 3) It assessed the perceptions of the policy-makers to this documentary form of “entertainment-education” and supplementary effects on their attitudes and intentions regarding the research findings.

 

The study provides valuable lessons for considering this as a tool for research dissemination, using either video data already collected as part of the study or new material. It offers new insights into the added value of video recordings to social research. It also identifies opportunities to provide greater credibility to a study, and a deeper, more contextual perspective from the people who are affected by it, for

increased understanding and commitment by those who develop and implement policy.

 

The presentation will cover:

• The kind of evidence policy-makers need and want when reviewing research studies, and the methodologies that support these needs.

 

• The ethical issues to consider in planning a video production, particularly among vulnerable groups.

 

• The necessary key elements of a video production.

 

• Planning a video – who to include and what kind of representation is necessary.  The audiences you need to consider.

 

• Handling multiple languages for both interviewing and in the final production.

 

• Tips on recording the interviews and scenes.

 

• Scripting and narrating a video for this purpose.

 

• How a discussion after the video increases engagement and commitment to the research findings.

This workshop is hosted by Jamie Guth (Global Health Connections)

 

Jamie Guth is a global health communications and research uptake consultant. She has more than 30 years of experiencing developing and implementing strategies in both high- and low-

income countries. She has a special interest in using research evidence for policy development, and teaches scientists how to

develop research proposals and communicate research evidence in order to change policy and practice. She was formerly the manager of communications at TDR, the Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases based at the World Health Organization, and Director of Public Relations/Marketing at the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in the United States.

photo Guth